How would you qualify the disruption of Meaningfulness? Why? Guest post by Doug Hewett

Post financial crisis, a new set of global expectations have emerged – that brands and business are not just responsible, but meaningful too. What does that mean? That a new generation are holding organisations to account for their authenticity, transparency, and their purpose.

For consumers this means voting with their ever decreasing disposable income – every pound, dollar, ruble or yen spent says something about the world they want to see, the companies they want to succeed and win. It’s no longer enough that your product is high quality, or that your store staff provide a great service…if you don’t pay your taxes and operate ethically as a business, they will destroy your brand and reputation in realtime with 140 characters.

Starbucks, Google, Uber and others are just some of the many of the high profile brands that have been attacked for their approach to tax. In the case of Starbucks, a leak exposing their tax avoidance led to a downturn in sales – something that opened the door for smaller independent coffee shops to capitalise on (with handmade window signs proudly proclaiming ‘we pay our tax’ – which were very publicly shared on Twitter and Instagram).

A greater transparency through social media and digital has brought company cultures into even sharper focus too. Where before decisions about supply chains and third party partners was something hidden from view, today’s socially conscious super-consumer bases their purchase decisions on factors such as ethically sourced materials, fair working policies in third world countries, and the philosophy of the CEO.

All this means that authentic brands win, and those without meaning and purpose fall further behind. Companies can’t fake it anymore.

If generational insight is anything to go by, we are looking at a tidal wave in terms of mindset – with consumers and employees increasingly placing meaning and purpose above financial gain. This shift will mean that social currency and personal reputation becoming even more significant drivers behind decision making, especially at an individual level.

Never before have the choices we make been so visible to all – which is why people are taking their decisions so seriously. Not just because it helps others, but because it says so much about ourselves.

From a brand or company’s perspective, what needs to be done to take advantage of it? 

The path to becoming a meaningful brand involves three key areas of consideration:

  1. Create a brand proposition that’s built on a clear purpose – align your business strategy with your brand strategy, driving profit and success through purpose and meaning. It will differentiate your company from the competition, and also build value and equity that sits on your balance sheet as an intangible asset. Use brand as a filter and guide for everything you do – shape all business decision-making around it and build a set of principles that guide global consistency, but allow for hyper-local flexibility.
  2. Embed that across your internal culture and ways of working– clarify and revisit your brand values, ensuring that they are more than words on a page. To truly make an impact your values need to be lived behaviours that are embedded into your performance framework and ways of working. Define your culture, how you work, and the unique mindset of the people you want to attract and retain. Analyse every part of your supply chain and partnerships – they are an extension of your business and by that token you are endorsing their working practices, so ensure they are brand friends that you value and trust with upholding the same high level of purpose.
  3. Activate that across your service experience – revisit and redraw your approach to service experience, considering how best to add meaning and purpose across every single touchpoint with customers or clients. Once the internal culture and ways of working are ‘lived’ then this approach will allow all that good work to surface – showcasing a genuine and authentic brand that lives by what it says. Become the keeper of promises and build a stronger brand through opening up to your customers and employees as a transparent leader with nothing to hide.

What are some of the risks and opportunities? 

The landscape of every industry is being turned upside-down by disruptive new challengers, and factors such as the rise of AI (artificial intelligence) will only magnify this impact in the near future. The real risk is not doing anything at all – so if you’re standing still you’re falling behind fast.

Being a meaningful brand drives success – it connects customers and employees to a clear purpose they can connect with, drives ethical behaviours that gain respect and trust, and ultimately keeps its promises to drive loyalty and growth.

The era of illusion is over, the most successful brands of tomorrow will be those with meaning and authenticity. It’s a race against time for businesses to respond quickly enough to consumer and employee expectations. The quicker you move, the bigger your advantage will be.

Doug Hewett futureroof MeaningfulnessDoug Hewett, Founder, People-Made

You can find Doug @doughewett on Twitter



The IOT Disruption – Guest post by Thomas Nicholls (@ThomasNicholls)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the idea of connecting more physical devices to the Internet, or more precisely, connecting physical objects through sensors and actuators to learn more about what’s happening in the physical world. The IoT will provide new insights, that will have a huge impact on existing business models, in regards to optimization, but probably more importantly, the IoT will provide a means to disrupt existing businesses and even create new ones.

Examples of disruption in existing businesses:

– Product vendors will gain new insights in where their products are installed: by sending geo-location info, vendors will be able to perform geo-marketing even if they use complex distribution channels.

– Product vendors will be able to ensure correct functioning of their products: by knowing the battery status, configuration, etc., companies will be able to provide better support and maintenance for products such as set-top boxes, fire detectors, defibrillators, fire hydrants, television sets, etc.

– Product-oriented companies will become service oriented: by knowing how their products are used, companies will be able to provide predictive maintenance and provide services related to the products, such as on-demand washing detergent, coffee grains/capsules, air freshener, just-in-time dispenser refills, etc.

– Existing products will finally be democratized and thus enable new volumes and variants: tracking embedded in everyday objects such as schoolbags, bicycles, etc.

All industries will be impacted by the IoT. Companies who take advantage of it now, will gain huge competitive advantages. This could therefore be a huge advantage for those who get it, and a worrying threat for those who don’t.

How has Sigfox disrupted by its Blank Canvas approach…  ?

The three existing connectivity solutions (GSM, WiFi and Bluetooth) restrict what we can connect. By building a specific connectivity solution for the needs of the IoT sensors and actuators, SIGFOX is able to provide the missing 4th communications protocol, which enables years-to-decades of battery life, extremely low costs, and borderless and provisioning-less simple connectivity management. The invention of this 4th protocol, will enable a gigantic long tail and volume market for the IoT.

Thomas Nicholls Futureproof SigfoxThomas Nicholls
Executive Vice President Communications at Sigfox |

Find Thomas on Twitter @ThomasNicholls

The Disruption From China & The East – Guest post by Marco Gervasi

China has become an innovator

China is now shifting from an innovation receiver to an innovation leader. Between 2013 and 2015, I have travelled and researched four continents to interview successful technology CEOs and understand what is happening in the technology world and in particular in e-commerce and in the Internet of Things. I have realized that the major technological changes that people are talking about in Silicon Valley are actually happening in China on a much larger scale. It used to take innovation years to travel from Silicon Valley to China, but now it only takes 24 hours. Not only Silicon Valley, but now also China have become a source of inspiration. But this is just the beginning. China’s innovation is not confined to its market; it is now coming out of its borders and spreading into the developing and the developed world. I narrated the story of this journey in a book, which I have called: East-Commerce

It is now widely recognized that China e-commerce has become the biggest in the world. Few numbers will explain the dimension of it. The world has over 3 billion Internet users of which 25% are in China, 667 million against 279 in the U.S. China has now over 361 million web shoppers compared to 200 million in the U.S. and its e-commerce demand for 2015 will be around 566 billion USD while in the U.S. will be 437 billions USD.

When looking at these numbers, it is hard to understand how Chinese e-commerce has grown so big so quickly and most of all where it is heading. To answer these questions I use some of the teachings I have learnt at Singularity University. Based in Mountain View, the Internet’s epicentre, and funded, among others, by NASA, Google, Cisco and Genentech, Singularity University helps people understand how technology will change our lives and which ones have the potential to impact billions of people. I believe that Chinese e-commerce is definitely one of those. Going back to our questions, How did it grow so fast? for the majority of us, change occurs at the same rate that we have experienced it most recently. But technology’s growth does not follow this rule. In other words, it isn’t linear, but exponential. The difference between linear growth and exponential growth is the basis of how technology evolves. Exponential growth is based on the famous dictum called Moore’s Law, named for Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore who described the trend in a 1965 paper. Moore’s Law observes that the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles approximately every two years. This means that the power of your computer or mobile phone doubles every two years and explains why China e-commerce is growing faster than anywhere else.

To understand where it is heading we first need to look back at how this world of the Internet evolved. In his award-winning book The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman described the personal computer as the change agent enabling anyone in the connected world to join the Internet and in turn, create a unified world. That was 2005. The wide diffusion of PCs and of the Internet made geography irrelevant and suddenly, everyone became connected. This is when a new world started to unfold. However, while the world was becoming flat thanks to the PCs produced by China, China was still lagging behind. The real technological revolution arrived in China thanks to another device: the smartphone. This was the agent that enabled mass connectivity and became the tool to access the Internet. Thanks to this vast diffusion of smartphones, the Chinese are now moving one step past the rest of the world in creating a super connected world where the physical and virtual dimensions meet inside a mobile phone in the most seamless of ways. This is where China is innovating and where it is creating some of the most interesting business models in sectors such as retail, automotive, finance, healthcare and many others.

Even thought the Internet, e-commerce, and social networks are products of the West, the way Chinese are using them is innovative in itself and is allowing a mass diffusion of these technologies on a huge scale. So far, everyone is still looking to the West, thinking that innovation comes only in one form: inventing something unique which becomes revolutionary. However, something that at first might seem paradoxical is happening in China. The innovation brought about by China, an incremental innovation on a mass scale, is changing the emerging world and will soon influence the developed world as well. This will be a new type revolution, one that is brought about by evolution.

But e-commerce is not the only sector where China is planning to be ahead. It is likely to become leader in the Internet of Things as well. E-commerce has in fact created a super connected world, where the physical and digital dimensions are now coming together like nowhere else on the planet. Through the adoption of Cloud services and data centers, this world has the ability to collect and analyze information on a massive population, which, in turn, allows the development of a very sophisticated grid. When you add the power of the Internet of Things – with its ability to generate an exponential amount of data – to this sophisticated grid, it will give rise to the development of even more innovative models not only for e-commerce, but also for the Internet if Things world itself.

But this is not the end of the story.

In The Singularity Is Near, Ray Kurzweil describes an event called the Singularity, a future period during which technological change will be so rapid that it will irreversibly transform human life. The transformation will affect all the concepts that we rely on from business models to the cycle of human life. China e-commerce and the Internet of Things are the world’s biggest experiments connecting the physical to the digital world. They are connecting human beings and technology on an unprecedented scale. Thanks to this fast digitization process, China has decided to take the road of reforming and evolving its civilization through technology; the road of the Singularity. This is evident today with the mass adoption of smartphones and the increasing number of businesses moving online.

A society that was once based on a traditional industrial model is now quickly becoming technologically advanced; smart homes, self-driving bicycles, and cars will soon be part of the lives of millions. Of course, it will take time for China to fully transform itself into a society based on the future technological model. E-commerce and the Internet of Things show that China has decided to take that road and the first steps to bring its civilization into the future.

The world should take notice.


marco-gervasi-futureproofThis article is excerpted from “East-Commerce, A Journey Through China E-commerce and the Internet of Things” by Marco Gervasi, published by Wiley & Sons in April 2016. The ebook is also available on Amazon. To learn more about how technology is changing our lives and the global business models you can follow Marco Gervasi on his blog.


Digital Transformation of Industries – Guest post by Eric Gervet

Over the last two decades digital technologies have manifested themselves as an extremely powerful combination of mutually reinforcing, exponential drivers of fundamental change.

At first this change took the form of exciting new channels to markets, a step change in our ability to exchange information, and an important source of efficiency. It is now clear, however, that digital technologies will transform almost every aspect of doing business, from redefining markets, putting customers in charge, disruptively innovating on every aspect of value delivery, making an entire range of new business models possible, and blurring industry boundaries. On top of that, digital technologies deeply transform the way we organize human activity and can put our knowledge and expertise to work, not just locally, but on a global scale.

From an industry and business perspective there are a number of dynamics that are of particular importance in this culmination of industry change driven by digital technologies:

Overload of opportunity

The combination of digital technologies creates a plethora of opportunities not only for doing things fundamentally better, faster, and cheaper, but also to redefine markets, customers, products and services, value chains, and business models. This comes with highly challenging consequences. Many companies are so busy dealing with the fall out, that they no longer have the organizational headroom to properly strategize the wealth of opportunities. As a result, many have become reactive to the digital technologies that have driven the change coming their way.

The risks and opportunities resulting from digital technologies have proven difficult to strategize mainly for two reasons:

  1. Most digital technologies related drivers of change can be observed to have exponential growth behaviors, as characterized by Moore’s Law and the network effect. This quickly goes beyond the limits of our imagination. We might envision what 50% more functionality could mean for us, but we have real problems envisioning what something will look like, or what it can do, if it has 5,000% times more functionality. This is further complicated by the fact that most digital technologies related drivers of change never act alone. Most of them strengthen and feed off each other in major ways. This makes that digital technologies play out in closely knit systems of drivers exponential change that are even harder to fathom than understanding the impact of a single individual driver of change.
  2. The overload of opportunity is a strong incentive for businesses to simply get going. Even without properly strategizing the way forward, there are so many opportunities that ensure benefits are certain to accrue, regardless of the direction taken. Competitor dynamics however, can quickly turn such pursuit of new opportunities into a frenzied effort just to stay competitive: whenever a competitor enjoys success in capitalizing on digital technologies in a specific way, others will have to add it to their to-do list to stay competitive. This can quickly lead to a situation in which companies are overly busy and captured in the here and now.

Customers are in the driver seat

If companies would do a Porter Five-Forces analyses today, most would find the results to be extremely predictable and remarkably similar for many different industries – at least in terms of their insights and implications.

For a start, almost all will be characterized by a truly massive shift in power towards customers. Their bargaining power has enjoyed a phenomenal boost, as digital technologies have enabled greater market transparency and accessibility. Customers are expecting – and are increasingly getting used to – an unlimited choice, getting more than they asked for, whenever, and wherever they want, for less than they paid before. This has triggered an almost universal drive to make organizations customer centric, to engineer the most enticing customer experiences and offer the most optimal sales processes – anything less would be a disappointment to customers.

Customer bargaining power is only half the story however.

Some of the other forces have gone through metamorphic change as well. The same technological trends that fuel the transparency for customers has also provided the basis for all sorts of dis- and re-intermediation at various points in the value chain, dissolving industry and business boundaries in the process. Technology has exponentially driven innovation opportunities, triggering the redefinition of products and services and the reconfiguration of entire value chains, routinely leading to new entrants and substitutes, networked business models, and eco-systems of business activities creating value for customers. Together with increasingly global markets, this has taken industry rivalry to its highest point yet.

All these dynamics create a double-edged sword. On the one hand, there has never been more opportunity to innovate and opportunities to take businesses to the next level, but at the same time, never has there been more need to do so just to stay competitive and to stay aligned with fast growing expectations from customers.

Unknown and disparate outcomes

Given this overload of opportunities and the relative difficulty in strategizing on which opportunities to pursue in hopes of capturing values, there is a clear incentive for businesses to simply get started. Many companies – both incumbents and startups – do so in a variety of ways, such as experimenting with digital ways of working, developing digitally enabled processes, launching new (digital) businesses, adapting business models, acquiring new capabilities through M&A, etc.

Such activities can be of crucial importance to put organizations on learning trajectories and provide them with the necessary transformational experiences that help it get their mind around new business paradigms. Experimentation with new concepts and pursuing new opportunities also helps companies take advantage of the potential created by digital technologies.

From a company perspective, without an overall strategy guiding these efforts, there is no reassurance that such digital exploration reinforces itself (or even that counterproductive efforts are avoided), nor is there any guarantee that the results are optimally relevant for the companies going forward.

As a result, there are substantial impacts on the value chains, activities, knowledge and people inside organizations that are left facing the digital dilemma. On one side of the spectrum, incumbents face a variety of threats and in some cases even the chance of outright substitution, while on the other, many start-ups explore new territories only to run into the end of their funding.

A much discussed logical response to such unknown and disparate outcomes is to become more agile and responsive so that companies can take greater advantage of the impact of digital technologies than competitors. In fact, agility is now commonly seen as a decisive factor for securing future success. Organizational agility is of course always a worthy goal to pursue, but it is not a true substitute for the strategy that allows for proactively making decisions crucial to charting the path to superior performance going forward.

Reclaiming control

There is now widespread recognition that going forward, most industries and businesses will go through sweeping metamorphoses. Many leading companies are already putting themselves though wholesale digital transformation. In doing so, companies can draw on the learning of almost two decades of digital technologies driven disruptive innovation and experimentation to help them capitalize on what digital technologies can offer to them and avoid becoming irrelevant in the digital onslaught.

The impact of digital technologies, however, is not confined to single companies; not only does it extends across company boundaries, blurring industry definitions and spurring growth in newly established business ecosystems, but in doing so has profound economic, social, and public effects. This puts a premium on being able to proactively deal with the opportunities and risks brought about by digital technologies.


Eric Gervet futureproofEric Gervet, @ericgervet
Head of San Francisco Office of AT Kearney,
Global Head of the Digital Practice at AT Kearney

Futureproofing Against The Disruption of AR and VR – Guest post by Olivier Cimeliere

Augmented & Virtual Reality – Is it a fad or a sustainable trend?

Virtual reality (VR) is clearly in the process of becoming a trend for communication by brands and by corporations. In North America, the content in virtual reality and augmented reality (AR) is increasingly integrated into the communication strategies of the major groups. And, at times, we are seeing VR experiences being enhanced with what might otherwise be considered “augmented” elements, i.e. clickable links within the virtual space. Although for a long time, the VR technology was reduced only to video games, it is now trying to prove itself as a conduit to other types of audience. That’s why Facebook did not hesitate to spend $2 billion in 2014 to buy Oculus Rift, a helmet that allows navigation in virtual and augmented content. This will change the way we communicate.

For brands and businesses, the benefits are many. First, offering virtual reality content has the advantage of positioning the brand as innovative, the better to differentiate oneself against one’s competitors. It is a remarkable (i.e. stand-out) activity for customers. This is a crucial point in time because we live in an era of information overload where the netizen’s attention is volatile and fragmented. Then, with virtual reality, one can offer an immersive experience where the user really feels in touch with the content they are viewing and with which they can even interact. For example, by opening a video clip or changing the point of view of a building or a landscape. Editorial possibilities are tremendous and are capable of being adapted according to the communication issues or targeted communities. There are new features that enhance the impact of the information you want to share. It is generally estimated that 80% of our attention span is primarily visual! These new devices have, therefore, their whole reason for being as part of a more comprehensive communication strategy.

A few examples

I will cite four examples to show that virtual reality can relate to very different sectors.

  1. The brand of sportswear and hiking, North Face. They have developed a mobile app that is also available in 3 shops in New York, Chicago and San Francisco. Thanks to a sophisticated 360° video capture, a customer can experience an immersive virtual hike in the famous Yosemite park in California or in the Moah desert in Utah. The idea is to entice people to buy the equipment in order to go enjoy this type of hike for real. The app was a great success in 2015, with 15,000 downloads on the Google Play platform alone!
  2. The Marriott hotel chain. They needed to become better known to younger audiences and thus designed two different VR experiences. The first took place in a London street where they offered passersby the opportunity to escape for a moment by being transported on to a beautiful beach in Hawaii for 100 seconds! The second instance was made available in certain Marriott facilities. It is a program called “Vroom Service.” Residents were able to request a special helmet and then – from the comfort of their hotel room – virtually wander around with another person in one of three dream destinations, in Chile, Rwanda or Beijing. Then inevitably the guest is tempted to book another trip!
  3. The NGO, Amnesty International. In exchange for a donation, passersby in London were allowed to wander virtually through a virtual reality helmet in the ransacked city of Aleppo, Syria, crafted through the photos and 360° video made by a group of Syrian citizen journalists. It was an effective way to raise awareness of the dramatic situation in the country.
  4. The chain of real estate agents, Nexity (based in France). They opened in November 2015 a connected agency in the heart of Paris. The particularity of this agency is to be able to visit a prospective property through the Oculus Rift technology. Virtual reality allows a visual immersion throughout the selected apartment or house, providing a very different experience and saving the customer precious time. The client can, thus, better refine his/her choice and visit on site only those properties that hold the biggest interest, rather than traipsing across town to see locations that did not deserve the trip.


The trend of virtual reality is clearly going mainstream. A concrete sign that times are changing: manufacturers, such as Sony and HTC, are also marketing virtual reality helmets. Although the video gaming area continues to lead the way, there is no doubt that the proliferation of this type of device will democratize access and the technology will quickly spread to other sectors. In particular, the media are starting to be more prolific users. In early November 2015, the New York Times distributed 1 million free VR cardboard goggles to subscribers and also launched a specific app with the intention of adding a monthly documentary. The US news agency Associated Press (AP) also just dipped its toe in the VR pool with a movie on the Calais shantytown in France, where thousands of migrant refugees from Africa and the Middle East had taken up camp. Meanwhile, Google intends to bring VR to the masses. Last year, they announced that YouTube would support video formats in VR and that viewers will be able to see all the YouTube videos via the cardboard goggles.

The firm, CCS Insights, recently published a report in which they predicted that 24 million VR compatible devices would be sold worldwide by 2018, representing a market size of approximately $4 billion. In terms of market segments, video games will continue to dominate according to financial analysts, hitting $1.4 billion in 2025. However, two other heavyweights, the NFL and the porn industry should generate, respectively, $1.2 billion and $1 billion.

Virtual reality is far from a techie fad or only for hard-core gamers. For brands and corporates, this technology provides very interesting opportunities to cultivate the relationships with their audiences. It’s an alternative way to gain greater proximity and deliver impact and foster engagement via a visual experience.

Olivier-Cimeliere futureproofOlivier Cimelière  @olivcim
CEO Heuristik Communications, a consultancy based in Paris
Author of “Le Blog du Communicant” (in French)

State of The Business of Diversity – Guest post by Antoine de Gabrielli

mercredi c papaI met Antoine de Gabrielli and his wife Beatrice de Gourcuff, through my wife and, as with only those rare relationships with spouse’s friends, I totally co-opted them as if they were my friends originally. They are a most impressive couple, boasting six children and a fun eclectic group of friends and an equally colourful home.

They founded and run Companieros (in French), a company whose purpose is to help companies transform, specifically in their plans to accept and integrate a more diverse workforce. Of the more genial initiatives, Antoine gave birth to a movement and an association called Mercredi-c-Papa, which promotes the idea that men should be more involved at the home, including taking care of the kids on the Wednesdays when kids only have a half-day of school in France, in order to help in the cause for greater equality between men and women at work. If he’s not on the campaign trail in his mission for diversity, he can be found driving around in a vintage car.

In this post, Antoine highlights some key facts about the diversity landscape via a chronology of 2015. If a year old, the facts and the direction remain essential. Antoine would surely agree that bringing in more diversity into your teams and company culture is a great way to help futureproof your organisation.

Guest post by Antoine de Gabrielli

January 2015: In France 85% of couples are dual earners.

  • The mobility of one’s spouse becomes a discriminatory factor for the other.
  • Beyond the specific issues related to the employment and management of men and women, there is a new emerging management challenge: dual-earner couples.

February 2015: Mark Zuckerberg unveils “Zee-city,” the Facebook city.

  • Daycare, concierge, convenience stores, housing … it’s the company that absorbs the city and not the reverse, to retain feminine talent, in particular.
  • Individual freedom or burgeoning totalitarianism?
  • The city and the social ties coming up against the universal enterprise.

May 2015 France: Civil recognition of children born abroad to homosexual couples.

  • Mother surrogacy: a commercialization of women, a boundary crossed (transgressed?)
  • The bellies of the poor women at the service of wealthy men.

June 2015: Success in France 1 European network of professionals committed to equality between men and women, the HAPPY MEN network.

  • Men are coming to understand that professional equality is beneficial for them, too. It opens the possibility of crossing the “glass floor” i.e. to work without sacrificing one’s personal life.
  • The need for a wholesome private life for professional and engaged men is beginning to be recognized.
  • 10 major partners in 2015 for Happy Men Network.

July 2015 Germany: 45% of graduates of higher education do not have children.

  • German birth rate: 1.38.
  • Massive opening of frontiers to migrants: 1 million entrants estimated in 2015.
  • Ethnic tensions (PEGIDA – Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the Occident / in German: Patriotische Europäer gegen die Islamisierung des Abendlandes)

October 2015: Publication of the 8th Women Matter study.

  • Proven benefits of professional mixity and equality between women and men: stop the waste of talent, better meet market expectations.
  • Indicator of organizational and managerial effectiveness: percentage of women leaders versus women working within the company.

October 2015: Facebook and Apple offer their workforce to support the costs of freezing oocytes.

  • Objective: “No longer have to choose between career and children.”
  • Bearing children takes a back seat to the career, thanks to science?
  • Female fertility under the control of the company.

November 2015: Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s CEO, said he would take parental leave for two months to care of his children.

  • By offering four months of parental leave to take care of the children, demonstrates that Facebook is far ahead of US law.
  • One key goal: to attract and retain top talent.

November 2015: In the USA, 29% of women have a higher income than their spouse.

  • In all issues of diversity, a tipping point is reached above 30%.
  • Men are faced with the prospects and challenges of free, family and social.
  • Solutions: to give value to that which is free or to commoditize?
  • The rise of expert-advisors of private life.

November 2015: In France, RATP (public transport services) faces the “religious fact” in business.

  • RATP crosses the line: the discrimination of women in business under the pretext of religion: no woman senior leader, no greeting, and a refusal to address women…

antoine de gabrielli futureproof diversityLogo-Happy-Men futureproof diversityAntoine de Gabrielli, based out of Paris, is Co-Founder and CEO of Companieros and President of Mercredi-C-Papa. He is also Founder of Happy Men, an inter-enterprise network for men who are committed to the battle for equality of the sexes. As their motto says, Happy Men share more.